Weekly Comic Reviews 7/11

And hello, welcome to this week’s edition of Unleash the Fanboy’s Weekly Comic Reviews, I’m your host, Daniel Alvarez. This week we’re seeing the debut of not one, but two new titles from Image, plus a pretty amazing ‘monstrous’ graphic novel. So, why don’t we get started?

Chew: Secret Agent Poyo #1

If you’re unfamiliar with Chew, you won’t have any problem following along with Secret Agent Poyo #1, but neither will you receive an introduction to the larger series’ story. Longtime fans will  definitely want to pick it up, howeverNot only is it consistent in terms of art and writing, but it has some ties to events in Chew #27. These seem cursory enough, but might be important going forward. Regardless, if you enjoy Chew, you need this book.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

Enormous

You don’t see many graphic novels like Enormous these days. Classic science fiction stuff in having humans on the run from giant monsters hasn’t been seen lately. In books, graphic novels, (thank goodness for Dinosaurs vs. Aliens) and even films. The last major monster movie in America was Cloverfield four years ago. (Hopefully Pacific Rim and then GODZILLA will revive the genre.) So you can imagine my excitement for this graphic novel. Giant monsters? Humans on the run from them?! People in general are probably going to overlook it because of its rather obscure appearance. That will be their biggest mistake this week. Enormous is a fun, fantastic book that shouldn’t be missed. The ending is a little unsatisfying (gives us the impression that there’s going to be a sequel despite it being a one-shot) but it doesn’t hinder the experience. Enormous is one of the best graphic novels I’ve read in awhile.

For the full review, click here.

5/5

Hoax Hunters #1

The premise of Hoax Hunters had gotten me very interested. It sounded like something in the found footage genre, like The Blair Witch Project or a better example would be Ghost Hunters. Stuff with legends, monsters, and ghosts I’ve always found entertaining. Add in that ‘reality’ feel, you have the makings of a good story. The first issue didn’t quite grab me the way I wanted it to. This series has a lot of potential, but a generally unexciting first issue.

For the full review, click here.

3/5

Peter Panzerfaust #5

It’s fair to call this issue an epilogue, as the creative team uses these pages to wrap up their inaugural story arc.  Instead of worrying about action or rushing the characters into further confrontation, this tale focuses in on the somber emotions that easily flow from the previous release.  Peter Panzefaust #4 progressed the series in the right direction, while Peter Panzerfaust #5 cements what happened and allows it to simmer.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

Planetoid #2

A successful follow up, Planetoid #2 does a great job leading on from the first issues set-up. With fantastic art and heavy industrial style, Planetoid offers a fresh take on an old story trope. Alot of credit and respect has to go to Ken Garing. After two great opening issues, its impressive the amount of work that’s done by one person on a monthly title. Garing is the artist, story writer and letterer. In short, Planetoid is his work, and the benefits of a unified, single vision can easily be seen in Planetoid #2.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

Revival #1

An excellent opener, Revival #1 is one of the most interesting opening issues i’ve read in a while. Its got equal parts suspense, drama, religious undertones and possible alien involvement. It may sound like a conspiracist’s dream come true, but underneath it all, Revival #1 is a well written and executed piece of work.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

Bionic Man #10

It’s this concept that keeps the title fresh. This isn’t just about half-robotic armies running around. Bionic Man #10 takes great lengths to subtly discuss and question the nature of humanity, and free will. The dialogue regarding the ethics in “shutting down” Austin in particular, emphasis this point. Its simple, yet adds enough depth to stop this becoming a simple action series with a loose science fiction concept. The title shows both the upsides and downsides to the fictional bionic men, updating the original TV series for a modern and intelligent audience.

For the full review, click here.

4.5/5

Jennifer Blood #14

This is a strong issue full of competent storytelling, courtesy of Al Ewing.  The script is beyond solid as it offers laughs and an organic feel that is wholly unafraid to explore some rather uncomfortable subjects.  Infidelity with regards to a somewhat stable marriage can be a hard story to cover, especially for a book like Jennifer Blood, but it works exceptionally well here.  The author deserves a lot of credit for accomplishing a script that not only covers touchy material but keeps the Ennis-esque comedy routine going.

For the full review, click here.

4.5/5

Kirby: Genesis #8

Let’s cut to the chase: Kirby: Genesis #8 is the first issue of the series I’ve read and, despite having covered both Silver Star and Captain Vicotory, I still have no real idea what is going on. I can definitely say that, while this is not the best jumping on point for new readers (that’s a shocker) there were still some interesting aspects to Kurt Busiek‘s story, most notably the meta-fictional elements. While these were undoubtedly present in earlier issues (the main character’s name is “Kirby”, after all) they come to a head here, specifically the head of Bobbi/Midnight Swan, who not only comes to her senses, but reaches some deep conclusions about Kirby in the process. Busiek also does an admirable job of keeping the tone grounded and realistic, despite the giant people floating in the sky.

For the full review, click here.

3.5/5

The Lone Ranger: Snake of Iron #1

Chances are that if you’ve grown up in the 2000s, you may have never heard of The Lone Ranger and his Native American pal Tonto. (The upcoming Disney film should be a good revival.) The Lone Ranger is a property that was practically made for the comics medium. The people that grew up with the original show would enjoy these comics especially. The original show (a true classic) never really delved deep into the characters and their backstories. It never had long reaching story arcs. Dynamite is using these characters in a new light, crafting intelligent stories while staying true to the mythos. Issue #1 of this new sub-series does exactly that, it’s a comic old amd new fans shouldn’t miss.

For the full review, click here.

4.5/5

Pantha #2

The opening story arc continues, as Pantha and her teammates attempt to figure out what do about the dark influence of Chaos.  It’s a fun little comic book that has goofy sounding characters and a bikini clad heroine as the protagonist.  Despite some new series growing pains, this issue succeeds enough to warrant a look.

For the full review, click here.

3.5/5

Queen Sonja #30

It’s a simple enough story that’s serviceable but sadly for the most part it’s rather boring.  It’s not that it’s a bad issue, it’s just slow in pace and more often than not you might find yourself wanting to skip ahead.  That being said the payoff at the end may be a bit predictable but it is solid.  That’s the heart of the problem in this latest release, as the overall narrative quality take a bit of a dip.

For the full review, click here.

3/5

Battle Beasts #1

In short, Battle Beasts #1 is a good opener. It sets up the series, offering enough exposition to understand the situation without going into detail. With decent art work to truly highlight the unique concept, this is a series for those who are willing to look past the less serious aspects of giant talking animals.

For the full review, click here.

3.5/5

The Crow #1

It’s been a view years since the last book in The Crow series, but now IDW is beginning a new series, this one set in  Japan.  he new Crow series is completely accessible to to readers, with no prior knowledge going in. If you’ve previously heard of the series, or the films, you should check it out. The same goes if you a fan of moody, evocative artwork.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

Doctor Who 100 Page Spectacular

A collection of old and more modern stories, the Doctor Who 100 Page Spectacular does exactly what it says on the tin: 100 pages of Doctor Who action. So, with five different stories focusing on four different Doctors, this is certainly alot for one book. A combination of Doctor Who past and present, most fans will definately want to give this a read.

For the full review, click here.

4/5

G.I. Joe Volume 2 #15

Its hard to describe something like G.I Joe 2 #15 without using words like “ordinary” or “typical”. This certainly feels like a G.I Joe title, which isn’t such a bad thing. In short, this has a few interesting factors, but at its core its classic, traditional G.I Joe. Depending on your opinion of the franchise, this could be very good, or something difficult to come to grips with. For the most part, it does enough to keep my eyes on the page.

For the full review, click here.

3.5/5

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Color Classics #3

This old school tale staring the original interpretation of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is at best an unbalanced issue.  It contains piles and piles of nostalgia combined with cringe-worthy dialogue that somehow yields a competent story.  It’s far from a perfect journey to the past, but thankfully the bad parts are slightly outweighed by the good.

For the full review, click here.

3/5

Transformers: Regeneration One #81

Transformers may be IDW’s biggest property. No, scratch that, it is their biggest property. The franchise over the years has gained more fans thanks to the comics, films, and TV shows. If you read the Regeneration One #80.5 issue from this year’s Free Comic Book Day, you know what to expect. This issue is perfect for fans wanting to come aboard. People that have seen the films or watch Transformers Prime on the Hub now have a place to jump in. (And no annoying human characters!)

For the full review. click here.

4/5

2000AD #1790

Another week, and 2000AD offers a fresh mix of British sci-fi comics. First up, as always, is Judge Dredd. This is a pleasant change from usual Dredd story lines, focusing more on dialogue than action. Taking place between Judge Dredd and an accountant, the interesting dialogue explores Dredd’s opinions and views on street Judges and those who aren’t street Judges. However, it is the penultimate issue of Nikolai Dante that is sure to grab the most attention. Following on from the previous issue, this is a gripping episode that is full of suspense and dialogue. I’m pleasantly surprised that its not all action. Rather than going out guns blazing, the dialogue between two enemies over a game of Russian roulette offers much suspense and excitement, as well as squeezing out the last possible character development possible.

For the full review, click here.

4.5/5

Author
I was born in the Big Apple and currently reside in New Jersey. Marvel is my favorite comic book company, with Spider-Man being my favorite character. But the absolute biggest thing you'll find me talking about is Godzilla. Besides the big G, my other favorite subject is My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, the greatest cartoon ever. My personal contact e-mail is djdjalvarez@Gmail.com