Revival_10

Revival #10 Review

Revival_10

Revival #10 is another one of those funny Revival issues that seem to act as filler. Although its good reading, there’s not much sense of development. Not of the existing major plot-lines, anyway.

The official description from Image:

Ibrahaim’s first door-to-door inspection goes badly when he’s sent to the Holt farm. The Check brothers have Cooper hostage, and unfortunately for them, it’s Em Cypress to the rescue.

When we last left Revival, things weren’t in the best of shape. The Check brothers had Cooper and there was a lot of ambiguous, suggestive foreshadowing in conversations between the Sheriff and the Mayor. In this issue.. the Check brothers have Cooper and there’s a little more foreshadowing. Honestly, the main plot barely advances, but everyone else does sort of dance around it, giving other characters a spotlight. Ibrahaim, for instance, has yet to really contribute as a worthwhile character.

This might be down to the writing. There’s no knocking Tim Seeley’s story, but sometimes they might be biting off more than they can chew. There’s so much going on, there’s no doubt that the town definitely feels alive, fleshing out the story. Yet it also means we jump from plot to plot. Sometimes, as in the case of Revival #10, little happens. I still like it, but its not the best issue of the series. Likewise, Ibrahaim is used to cover racist themes, which have already been touched upon with Tao; do we need another? Is this what Revival is about?

As for the art, there are no complaints here. Mike Norton delivers quality art work again. His attention to detail, especially with faces, serves this title well, especially during personal scenes. The team still knows when to add large panels and give way to Norton’s impressive work, letting the visuals do the talking.

All in all, this is still a good issue of Revival. It looks great and reads well. Still, I can’t help feeling that, as a stand alone example, it doesn’t contribute much to the series.

3.5/5

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